Tips to Help Choose a Connection & Support App After Cancer

After a cancer diagnosis life can feel chaotic. Choosing a good connection and support app can help everyone stay on the same page and keep things running smoothly. If you are new to the cancer experience, you may not know where to start with organizing support. Our Supporter Roadmap is a great first read to find helpful information and tips to navigate this difficult time.


Understanding what is ahead and how your loved one with cancer wants to connect and be supported will help frame how to move forward and work together to organize and empower the support network. The next step is finding some helpful tools and resources to make communicating easy, keep you up to date and in sync with their needs.

Finding the Right App

There are a variety of apps and tools available to help with organizing support, connecting patients with their caregivers and peers, and improving communication and connection. For example, if you want a simple and easy tool to clearly communicate with each other, the b-there App for connection and support is a great option. Click the button below to learn more.


It is often a personal choice when it comes to selecting the best app(s) for the job, and it depends on the needs of the patient and the support network. Continue reading for some helpful tips to find an app that is right for you.

Questions to ask:

  • Ease of use
    • Is the app user-friendly and easy to navigate?
    • Does it have a clear and simple interface that allows users to find the information they need?
    • The more complex the app is, the less likely people will use it.
  • Customization
    • Does the app allow users to customize their profiles and communication preferences? This includes setting privacy settings, as well as selecting who has access to certain information.
  • Features
    • Does the app have features that are useful for both the patient and the support network?
    • Some examples: requesting support (meals, transportation, errands, visits, items), sharing status updates (short form or journal entries), desire to connect, and private messaging.
  • Privacy/Security
    • Does the app protect personal information and data?
    • Does it require user authentication to login?
    • Are you able to delete people from your network, as well as completely delete your account at any time?
  • Community
    • Does the app have a supportive community of users who can provide support and advice?

Tips to Help Choose a Connection & Support App After Cancer

App features to consider

Define the key features and functions most helpful and important to the loved one being supported and the support network. Consider getting together to discuss your goals with using the app and brainstorm what features are necessary. Everyone will have different goals, so try to find a good compromise.

Below is a list of features to consider:

  • Login + Authentication
    • Do you prefer to use one of your existing accounts to log in or do you prefer to use your email and create a password?
    • When you are done using the app, are you able to completely delete your account (caution: uninstalling the app does not necessarily mean your data is removed).
  • Profile
    • Do you want to be able to access your contacts, photos when creating your profile?
    • What kind of information is important to include in your profile?
    • Is the information optional or required? Having fields that are optional is nice and gives you the flexibility to share as you see fit.
  • Network Setup
    • Prefer an invite-only network or do you want anyone that wants to help see your status and needs?
    • Want to limit what each person sees?
    • Do you want to be able to delete contacts that are less than helpful?
  • Status + Updates
    • What is your communication style?
    • What will be most helpful for the group to organize support and be present to best match your needs?
    • Direct and to the point? Or is a journaling format more your thing?
      • A journaling feature is helpful for processing emotions as well as keeping people updated, and some supporters enjoy reading the longer entries. However, other supporters may prefer short, clear directions so they can best understand how you are and how they can show up for you. With a journaling style, they may still need clarification on what support is needed, so make sure other features address this more immediate information need.
  • Calendar + Scheduling
    • Is it important to have a calendar within the app, or do you prefer to use your own calendar to track events and tasks? There are advantages to both, and it just depends on whether you will be diligent about checking multiple calendars or prefer having everything in your master calendar associated with your email.
  • Wishlist
    • Do you want to be able to coordinate needed items or activities? If so, a wish list can be a useful feature. To avoid duplication, ensure there is a signup management feature so that once someone claims a wish, it is no longer available to others. This will save time and avoid confusion and duplication of wishes. Also, being able to provide links to exact items, shared documents or lists reduces stress for everyone.
  • Messaging
    • Do you want to have a messaging system within the app, or is it easier to use your existing communication methods separately from the app? Similar to the calendar feature, things can get missed if you have to track multiple apps. Also, consider whether the loss of those messages after the account is deleted is a problem.
  • Notifications
    • Do you want to be notified when there are updates? If so, how?
    • Do you want to have the flexibility to adjust your notification preferences?
  • Health Information Tracking
    • Do you want the app to be a full-service app that tracks other health information as well? It can be nice to have everything in one place, but may also create a much more complicated app experience. This is especially true if you are connecting to other health or hospital systems.

Although not a complete list, the feature list above will get the conversation started. Once you have your list of needs, compare it to the features and functionality of each app and select the one that best fits those needs. In some cases, you may need more than one app to meet your support needs.

When in Doubt – Ask the Community for Their Input

If you still have questions or are unsure, consider asking health professionals, other patients, and caregivers that have experience to get their feedback on a particular app. Before making a final selection, confirm it will work for everyone. If the app is too complicated for the group, or not available for their mobile device, those can be deterrents to staying coordinated.

Tips to Help Choose a Connection & Support App After Cancer 2

Connection and support app options

Several online connection and support apps are available. Here are a few apps designed to improve connection and support after a cancer diagnosis (listed alphabetically):

  • b-there connection & support: A free mobile app that eases communication and connection. Patients and survivors can share their status, desire to connect, manage activities, and request needed items. Supporters can check the app for updates on how their loved one feels before connecting or stopping by, and they can sign up to fulfill items from their wish list.
  • CaringBridge: A free, personal website that allows patients and their loved ones to share updates, photos, and videos. It also provides a way to schedule meals, rides, and appointments.
  • Ianacare: A platform that makes it easy to coordinate and schedule help and support for patients and their caregivers. It also provides a way to connect with other people who are going through similar experiences.
  • Lotsa Helping Hands: A care coordination platform that enables friends and family to provide support to loved ones during a health crisis.
  • MealTrain: A meal coordination platform that makes it easy for friends and family to sign up to bring meals to patients and their caregivers.

Have you had a good experience with another app? Contact us and share the link.

Helpful tips for using the app

After selecting the app, these steps will help ensure the best experience possible.

Send everyone the app information 

Send them a link and be sure it is available on their mobile device. Urge them to download the app, register, and set up their account as soon as possible, ensuring they are ready to support when needed. If it is helpful for group members, set up a time to get together and walk through the app and help everyone become familiar with it.

Agree to some basic support ground rules

Setting a few ground rules about group behavior, including communication etiquette, providing timely updates, checking the app regularly, following through, responding to wish invitations, and honoring visit and support preferences, will keep things on track. It may help to identify a lead and a backup supporter to ensure timely updates are provided when a loved one is unwell or unable to provide their own updates. A tool is only as good as the information provided, so if it is outdated or incorrect, you may get the opposite effect, discouraging the support network from staying connected, and worse, causing the person needing help to feel unsupported.

Check the app regularly 

Notifications vary from app to app, so everyone needs to check the app regularly so updates and needs are not missed. Life gets busy, so setting a regular reminder to check is always a good plan. Once support is underway, work together to keep things running smoothly. Needs and updates will vary, but if there is an important update and you want to make sure everyone sees it, you can also use a group chat urging everyone to check the app (remembering to honor any privacy guidelines set out by the patient on these other channels).

Be specific with needs 

When asking for support or comfort items, the old saying “be careful what you wish for” holds especially true here. If you have something specific in mind or if there are some critical date/time/location requirements, be as specific as possible. This means including links to shared documents or lists or, as appropriate, a URL to a specific item so the supporter clicks the link and has a clear idea of what is needed (or buy the item). The clearer you can be, the better – it will reduce confusion and stress for everyone.

Tips to Help Choose a Connection & Support App After Cancer 3

We’re stronger together.

It takes a village to support someone going through a difficult life event like cancer, so work together, be flexible, be patient, and kind to each other. The experience will likely be new for everyone. A good coordination tool is only one piece of the puzzle. Good communication is also vital to providing good support. We don’t know what we don’t know, so being clear will save time, energy, money, and, most importantly, reduces stress and uncertainty. Have each other’s back, try not to take things personally, and respect your loved one’s choices and decisions.

By following these basic guidelines and using the tool(s) consistently, you will be stronger together. By everyone doing their part, the workload will be more manageable, and the quality of life will improve for your loved ones and you.

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Supporter Mistakes: What To Do When You Get It Wrong

We all want to support our friend with cancer in the best way we can, and most of us would shudder at the thought of saying or doing the wrong thing when trying to support them. Inevitably though, because you can’t know what it’s like to be in their shoes, you will get it wrong at some point. Mistakes happen. But fear not – unless you say something particularly hateful, most of these gaffes can be overcome with the proper response. So what do you do when you get it wrong?

Acknowledge mistakes without trying to justify them

This is important. Nothing is more frustrating than someone trying to apologize to you while also justifying their actions. Acknowledge that you were wrong and don’t give any sort of qualifiers to it. 

Give a whole-hearted apology

Make sure that when you apologize, it is clear that it comes from the heart. Don’t just flippantly say sorry, make it clear that you’re committed to correcting whatever you did wrong. 

Don’t dwell on the mistakes

This is the most important part. I had so many times when friends would get it wrong and apologize, but then walked on eggshells around me afterward. Make sure that when you apologize, and they accept your apology, you move on without awkwardness. If you continue walking on eggshells, you’ll probably make them more uncomfortable than the original gaffe did. 

Using these three steps, you will be more prepared to move past any awkwardness that might arise in your friendship. Want a more in-depth conversation about an example of getting it wrong and making it right, check out our podcast episode, What To Do When You Get It Wrong.

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Improve Your Conversations With Active Listening

Have you ever been in a conversation and thought to yourself, “Wow, this person really hears me, understands me, and supports me?” We have. It’s those moments of genuine connection that we cherish so dearly. But great conversations take practice and dedication from both parties. If you’re looking to level up your conversation skills and nurture your relationships, practice and master active listening—giving your full attention to the speaker and focusing on what is being said rather than just passively ‘hearing’ them.

Why practice active listening?

It earns the speaker’s trust and helps you to understand their situation. Active listening consists of a desire to comprehend and offer support and empathy to the person speaking. Be fully present, engaged, and immersed in what the other person is saying. Prepare to listen, observe what verbal and non-verbal messages are being sent, and provide appropriate feedback to show attentiveness. 

Unhelpful listening habits:

  • Interrupting
  • Not making eye contact
  • Rushing the speaker
  • Becoming distracted
  • “Topping” the story
  • Forgetting what was said
  • Daydreaming

How does active listening benefit your relationships?

It allows you to ask questions so you can fully understand where the other person is coming from and respond with empathy. And, it validates the person speaking and makes them want to continue talking to you.

Listening actively to a friend going through a difficult time is a valuable skill because you will be less likely to jump in with a “quick fix” when the other person just wants to be heard. It’s one of the best gifts you can give your loved one.

Want more?

The Support Report with b-present – How Support Changes Lives

Our new podcast, The Support Report with b-present, is hosted by our very own Justin Peters. Each month we share real stories from young adults and dive deep into how support changed their lives. We explore their challenges, triumphs, and everything in between. We want the Support Report  to inspire, entertain, and empower you to create your own stories of support and presence for others within your community.

The Need

Now more than ever, people are experiencing the need to connect and realizing how much it hurts when they are not. They need to know that they are not alone in their struggles and that there is someone beside them to lean on, laugh with, and learn from. However, providing support is not always easy, and the moments when someone needs us most may also be the moments we have to dig the deepest to get through. But know this…

Those moments matter. 

 

When a young adult faces a life-altering experience, their health becomes dependent on the presence of others. Whether it is a diagnosis, loss of a loved one, mental struggles, or grief, the support of a loved one is vital. Having supportive people in our lives helps us through tough moments so we can enjoy moments of relief, joy, and hope. 

Let’s talk about it

The Support Report exists to help you develop empathy and compassion that leads to improved connections. By self-reflecting and applying what you learn we hope to help you become better supporters for the future. And we want to inspire you to create change in your own lives and communities by volunteering your time and talent, advising or starting organizations, and creating products or services that solve problems you have experienced or have the means to solve. While you may not be able to change the past, you can learn from others’ experiences and find new ways to be present with purpose and change the future for those that need you most.

Check out our current podcast episodes:

Want to be featured on The Support Report?

So how has being a supporter or receiving support changed your life? We’d love to share YOUR story. Email us at [email protected] so we can start the conversation!

 

How To Stay Connected To Friends From Afar

Friendships are one of the most important aspects of our lives, and staying connected when isolated is essential for our mental health. Whether you have a friend that is stuck in the hospital or a long-distance BFF, remember there are tons of ways to b-present and stay connected to friends from afar. Video chats like FaceTime, Zoom, and Google Hangouts have been our favorite way to check-in with family and friends, but have you tried out these fresh new ways to connect?⁣

Game Together

HouseParty is a video group chat app for smartphones. In addition to chatting face-to-face, you can play interactive games, including Heads Up and Quick Draw, which is like Pictionary. There are also screen sharing capabilities. 

GameApart takes game night virtual. You can play board and card games online with your friends and family via Zoom, Google Hangouts, or Facebook Messenger. No matter where you are, you’ll never miss game night again!

Jackbox Games allows you to play with up to 10 friends in front of a virtual audience of up to 10,000. Just hop on a video chat service (like Zoom or Google Hangouts) and start a game on your laptop. You can use the screen sharing option so that players you’re on a call with can see the game. Everyone can play along on their own mobile devices by using a browser and going to Jackbox.tv.

QuizUp is a virtual trivia app where you can play against your friends in real-time. It has different categories and thousands of topics. You can download the app and hop on a video chat to show everyone what you know.

Scattegories is a classic fan-favorite, and it is available to play virtually for free. Just download the app and challenge a friend via video chat.

Words With Friends 2 is for all the Scrabble lovers out there looking for a fun brain exercise with some company. 

Playing Cards website lets you invite friends to play board games and card games like chess, go fish, crazy eights, and any other card game using a standard 52-card deck. All movements are synchronized, and if you add in a video chat, it’s pretty much like you are playing them in real-life.

Ticket To Ride will virtually feed your and your friend’s wanderlust. It costs $7 to download for each person who wants to play, but building a virtual train ride across America is time well-spent with friends. Pair the game with a video chat, so it feels like you are on the adventure together!

Friendship Bingo keeps you accountable for staying connected. Loneliness is painful, especially when you are living with loneliness for a prolonged period of time. Putting your time, energy, and attention into your close circle of friends can help ease the feelings of isolation and bring back a sense of normalcy. It’s hard times like these that help us to appreciate the friendships we are lucky to have.

Watch Together

Netflix Parties is a fun way to watch Netflix shows and movies with your friends. There is a chat window where group members can comment and chat during the show.⁣

Facebook Watch Party allows the host to pick out a queue of Facebook videos and line them up for the party to watch together. The host invites friends (other friends can join later too), and they can see and hear each other, as well as comment on the videos. ⁣

Do a virtual workout together. There are tons of options when it comes to accessing quality fitness classes anytime from your laptop, tablet, or smartphone. The cherry on top? Many of them don’t require any special equipment! Check out virtual Zumba classes or YMCA360.

Live stream a concert Move the couch, put on your dancing shoes, and turn on the video chat so you can boogie together. Because everyone loves living room dance parties.

 

How do you stay connected to friends?

Let us know if we need to add any fun activities to this list!

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What Do I Say to Someone With Cancer?

You just got the call that your friend has cancer. If you are a young adult, this may be the first time you personally know someone your age that has cancer. If that’s the case, you probably have no idea what to say or how to interact. We’re here to help you find the answers so you can be the supportive friend they need during this hard time.

 

Crush the stigma

First of all, cancer places a stigma on conversations. The perception of cancer, what it means for the future, and what it physically and mentally does to a person can sometimes make others feel uncomfortable talking to the person diagnosed. The reality is your friend has not changed as a person, so remember to speak to them the same way you did before their diagnosis. The more you change how you interact with your friend, the more they are reminded that life is different, and they have cancer. The more you filter your conversation, the more isolated and disconnected they will feel to you and the outside world. 

Every cancer experience is different, and there will be temporary changes to your friend’s physical and emotional state. Take these into consideration, but remember to stay authentic to your relationship. You won’t be giving your friend the escape and normalcy they need if you are suddenly treating them differently, holding back, acting awkward, over-filtering, or just saying weird things that you would never have said if they didn’t have cancer. 

 

 

Here are a few things to remember:

 

  • Be present, not perfect. Avoid letting your fear of making a mistake keep you away. Nobody is perfect, and missteps will happen. It is part of being human. This is a new situation for both of you, and there will be plenty of times where both of you don’t know what to do or say. 

 

  • Be flexible and meet them where they are physically and emotionally each day. It is always a good idea to check-in. Asking your friend, “What do you feel like doing today?” will help you know how to connect (tone and energy), and what to discuss (or save for another day).

 

  • If you visit in person, turn your phone off and put it aside so you are not distracted. Don’t be the person that visits, but spends more time looking at their phone than the person they are visiting.

 

  • If a misstep happens, acknowledge it and be sure to ask for forgiveness or be willing to forgive. Life is too short to stay angry.  

 

  • Sometimes having an activity to focus on can neutralize the stress of what to say and ease the conversation.

 

  • Let your friend initiate private or sensitive topics. Don’t be offended if certain topics are suddenly off the table. 

 

  • Avoid saying hurtful things or sharing information that will increase their stress. They are already dealing with a lot, and negative comments can impact their mood, stress level, and treatment response.

 

  • Don’t be afraid to joke and laugh with your friend (of course it goes without saying to not joke at their expense). Cancer creates some really ridiculous situations, so be ready to laugh at yourself for doing or saying something dumb. It will happen, so just own it.  

 

  • There will be moments of silence. Embrace those moments, learn to become comfortable with them, and realize that sometimes silence is what your friend wants…with you by their side. Silence is an opportunity to reflect, empathize with your friend, and appreciate your friendship. Many of our Talking Tips come from moments where a friend is trying to break the silence or console a friend, and it backfires. 

 

  • Know when it’s time to wrap things up. Your friend may not want to hurt your feelings and tell you it is time to leave. Be on the lookout for cues (or agree to an end time in the beginning so it doesn’t feel personal on either side). 

 

  • Keep it fresh and interesting. Find ways to learn, grow, and create new memories together. Consider planning a topic to discuss or an activity to do in-between visits (or get the materials in advance for your next visit). 

 

  • Schedule a regular time to meet or connect. It will give both of you something to look forward to and plan for.

 

Moving forward together

We highly recommend watching Hernan Barangan’s “My Friend Has Cancer” six-part video series about what to do and what to say when your friend has cancer. Hernan is a cancer survivor and director of the film Cancer Rebellion. His helpful and entertaining videos bring together survivors and supporters for a weekend getaway, sharing insights and perspectives on how to interact after a cancer diagnosis, during treatment, and beyond. Seize the Awkward also provides some great tools and tips for getting the conversation started for young adults struggling with depression, anxiety, and other mental health issues.

 

 

At the end of the day, all your friend wants and needs from you is compassion, connection, and normalcy. If you know what kind of support your friend desires, you can ensure they receive it. Here are some suggestions for how to move forward together. You can do this! 

 

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You Just Found Out Your Friend Has Cancer – Now What?

Most young adults never expect to hear the words “I have cancer” come up in a conversation, and they feel totally unprepared when it does. The news that your friend has cancer feels scary and overwhelming, but it is important to approach the news with courage and compassion. Life is upended, and your friend needs you now more than ever. Your presence will give them the stability they need as everything else around them changes. With a shared understanding of what is ahead and the support your friend desires, you will ensure your friend receives the support needed during treatment and beyond. Here are some suggestions for how to move forward together.

Step 1: Understand what’s ahead

 

  • Every person responds differently to the news, and not everyone wants to share it with others. When your friend with cancer shares their diagnosis with you, it means they trust YOU with that information, so be sure you understand and respect their privacy wishes. Sharing the news with the wrong people can impact relationships, work, school, and even insurance.

 

  • Depending on the cancer stage of cancer at diagnosis, treatment may start immediately or there may be a few weeks before it begins. It may require an extended hospital stay (inpatient), or your friend may be commuting to the hospital intermittently for procedures (outpatient). Your friend’s support needs will vary depending on their care plan as well as how they are feeling on a given day in response to treatment.

 

Step 2: Learn how your friend wants to be supported

 

  • Connection, support, and normalcy are the things your friend needs from you. Stay authentic to your relationship and remember that the diagnosis has not changed who your friend is on the inside.

 

  • When asking how you can help, your friend may not have an answer. That is okay. Sometimes just listening and providing a safe space to process their emotions is all they want. Needs may come up naturally in the conversation. If they are looking for answers or inspiration, help them find it. If questions come up, write them down so your friend can ask the medical team later. If there are resources you think might be helpful, share those when the time feels right. Be careful to not be that person that pushes all of your beliefs on them. Respect their choices and decisions and offer recommendations only when asked. Help comes in many forms, so find positive and meaningful ways to make their day better.

 

  • Clear communication of needs is key, but it is humbling to ask for help and is sometimes hard to know what to ask for in the beginning. Having to come up with needs may lead to added stress. Offering specific items or help will ease the burden of asking, but remember to give them room to decline your offer without taking offense. They may just not be ready to receive what you are offering on that day. It is not personal.  As they get more comfortable asking for and accepting help, offering and providing support will get easier.

 

Step 3: Work together to establish a support network

 

  • It is important to organize the peer support network early and emphasize the importance and impact their support will have on your friend’s quality of life.  The first few weeks after diagnosis is often when many friends and peers will fade away, never be heard from again. Reinforcing how they make a difference may help motivate them to stay connected. 

 

  • If you or your peers are struggling with showing up, find the help needed to work through it. Remember you don’t have to do something big to be in someone’s life and make a difference. If you can’t get past it, let your friend know you are struggling. Honesty and authenticity are so important during this time and assure your friend you are not abandoning them.

 

  • Create a group chat so you can stay coordinated and reach out to each other as needed. Make sure everyone is on the same page with the privacy guidelines.

 

  • Find a tool that best meets the needs of your friend and the support network. There are several online tools available to help support networks stay connected, including b-there, a connection tool designed specifically for young adult cancer patients. Other tools available include CaringBridge, MealTrain, Lotsa Helping Hands, and IanaCare. Whatever works best for your network and will help you stay connected and consistent is what you should use.

 

  • The more supporters that can stay connected, the more likely consistent support can be achieved. Your friend won’t always want or need support, but being there when support is needed is vital to their quality of life. As we have learned from COVID-19, presence is more than being in the same room. There are many ways to connect without being in the same place, and just showing up, in person or virtually, makes a big difference. 

 

 

Step 4: Be consistent and committed

 

  • If you have a busy schedule with many competing priorities, commit to a regular check-in routine, and put a reminder on your calendar. This will help you stay consistent, and your friend will appreciate the assurance that they are not alone. 

 

  • Put the device down when you are together (unless you are using it to enhance your conversation)

 

  • LISTEN without distractions or judgment.

 

 

  • Embrace the silence when there is nothing to say, and acknowledge when you don’t know what to say. 

 

  • Every day will be different. Depending on the cancer treatment, how your friend is feeling, and what other life stressors exist, some days will feel normal, and others will be a struggle for your friend. Try to understand their current emotional and physical state so you can find ways to best support them.

 

  • If you are unsure how to help during certain situations, there are resources that can help you work through the challenges and stay committed. If you need peer to peer support, options include Imerman Angels, GRYT Health, Cancer Lifeline

 

  • Don’t give up. Your friend may not be feeling well enough to answer your text or call, but know that they read and hear them all and appreciate you checking in.

 

Step 5: Take care of yourself too

 

  • You have to be present with yourself before you can truly be present for others. If you are feeling stressed, anxious, or tired, be sure you are making time to recharge and heal.

 

  • If you are feeling sick, remember you can be a health risk to your friend. Find an alternate date to hangout or a different activity, so you can keep them safe. Even if you can’t be with them in person, there are many other ways to be present. It is about finding balance, making time when you can, and prioritizing your friend’s needs when you know they need you.

 

  • There will be times when you need to talk and process your feelings to keep your own mental health in check. It’s important to avoid venting your frustrations to the person that is undergoing treatment. They are probably already feeling like a burden. Don’t be afraid to ask for help from a therapist, friend, counselor, trained social worker, or other trusted confidant (always remembering your friend’s privacy wishes). Unresolved emotions can build up and will affect your ability to support, so make sure you find the person or activity that gives you some relief.

 

Step 6: Make the best of every moment together

 

  • Make the time to be present when they need you, give them space when they need it, stay flexible, and be understanding when things do change.

 

  • Take turns answering the question “How are YOU doing?” (One-word answers don’t count 😉). It can be easy to forget that both the survivor and supporter are going through a difficult time. Allowing each to feel like their experience matters can bring you closer together.

 

  • Recreate old memories to provide comfort and a sense of normalcy.

 

  • Create new memories and traditions that you can plan and experience for the first time together.  

 

  • Find activities that you can do/learn together and keep the conversation fresh (yoga, music, art project, webinar, mini book club, etc). 

 

  • Find forgiveness when emotions flare. Life is too short to hold grudges. Work through it, learn from it, and move forward. If it helps, have a favorite picture of the two of you handy—it will remind you of how great your friendship is and can help pull you through the challenges.

 

  • We are never guaranteed tomorrow, so don’t put off a visit or connection because “something better” came up. Think of it this way, ten years from now, will you remember a meaningful one-on-one night with your friend that needed you or the Friday night party? If you choose to go to the party instead, be honest with your friend and have the courtesy to cancel or reschedule. Tables turned, what would you hope your friend would do?

 

Let us know your thoughts. If you didn’t find the information you were looking for, please don’t hesitate to contact us with any questions you have. We’re here to help.

Want more?

 

The Support Report with b-present – How Support Changes Lives

Our new podcast launches in 3…2…1! Tune into The Support Report with b-present hosted by our very own Justin Peters. We will be sharing real stories from young adults and dive deep into how support changed their lives. We’ll explore their challenges, triumphs, and everything in between. We’re here to inspire, entertain, and empower you to create your own stories of support and presence for others within your community.

The Need

Now more than ever, people are experiencing the need to connect and realizing how much it hurts when we are not. We need to know that we are not alone in our struggles and that there is someone beside us we can lean on, laugh with, and learn from. However, providing support is not always easy, and the moments when it is needed most may also be the moments we have to dig the deepest to get through. But know this…

Those moments matter. 

 

When a young adult faces a life-altering experience, their health becomes dependent on the presence of others. Whether it is a diagnosis, loss of a loved one, mental struggles, or grief, support is needed. Having supportive people in our lives helps us through tough moments so we can enjoy moments of relief, joy, and hope. 

Let’s talk about it

The Support Report exists to help you develop empathy and compassion that leads to improved connections. We want you to self-reflect and apply what you learn to become better supporters for the future. And we want to inspire you to create change in your own lives and communities, by volunteering your time and talent, advising or starting organizations, and creating products or services that solve problems you have experienced or have the means to solve. While we may not be able to change the past, we can learn from others’ experiences and find new ways to be present with purpose and change the future for those that need us.

Want to be featured on The Support Report?

So how has being a supporter or receiving support changed your life? We’d love to share YOUR story. Email us at [email protected] so we can start the conversation!